SUBMITTED
PCHS broadcasting students attend last month’s National Television Association banquet in Phoenix, Ariz. From left to right- Gabriella Denaldi, Sidonie Cassoret, Federico Spinola, Shelly Nee, Daniil Razov, Noah Guilbault and Marina Baques-Corcuera.
SUBMITTED PCHS broadcasting students attend last month’s National Television Association banquet in Phoenix, Ariz. From left to right- Gabriella Denaldi, Sidonie Cassoret, Federico Spinola, Shelly Nee, Daniil Razov, Noah Guilbault and Marina Baques-Corcuera.
LOVELOCK — What group in Lovelock speaks six languages, directs, produces, acts and flies to Phoenix, Arizona? 

If you guessed Shelly Nee’s broadcasting class at Pershing County High School, you’re right.

The Pershing County School District owns and operates K14KQ Channel 14. Nee and her students have kept it humming for 22 years.

If you visit their Facebook page, be sure to watch the Pershing County Horror Show from 2012, a first attempt at a suspense video.

They also filmed the Be the Light Parade in 2020, when Covid squelched school sports, the prom and the traditional graduation ceremony. 

Over the years, they’ve covered everything from football games to a first-grade butterfly release.

This year, four foreign exchange students signed up — Gabriela Denaldi from Brazil, Sidonie Cassoret from France, Federico Spinola from Italy and Marina Baques-Corcuera from Spain.

Altogether, the class spoke French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Russian and English. They ran with the challenge and made it work. 

Their first on-air production took place in front of a live audience at last month’s Art Show and Student Showcase. 

Mark Matiukhin moved to Lovelock in March, in time to help with the project, attended by over 330 people. 

When Denaldi signed up for the class, she expected to edit videos. 

“Going through the ups and downs of preparing packages, editing, writing lines and speaking for a live show made me realize so much more exists behind each clip,” she said.

“It wasn’t easy for me because I had just arrived in the United States and I couldn’t speak English well,” said Spinola. “Mrs. Nee helped me from the first day by teaching me new skills daily. What I liked most, besides learning skills, was the teamwork and the result of the show.”

Last winter, the National Television Association invited Nee to speak at its annual conference in Phoenix. The NTA aims to provide TV and FM signals to rural towns across America. The 2022 conference focused on low power television stations like Channel 14.

When the NTA offered to foot the bill for several of Nee’s students, she agreed to speak at the conference. Art teacher Kate Johnson came along as a chaperone.

“We balanced the intensity of the conference by arriving a day early and making a trip out to the Grand Canyon,” she said. “We toured Phoenix and Old Town Scottsdale seeing sights such as the Frank Lloyd Wright Biltmore Hotel and the State Capital.”

“At the conference, the students attended presentations, took turns working our booth and answered questions about K14KQ Channel 14,” she added. 

“I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.” The statement is as true today as when Confucious said it in the 6th century. The Chinese sage would have loved Shelly Nee’s broadcasting class.